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Everything-PowerShell

Everything-PowerShell

Here is a quick PowerShell tip for viewing the status of database seeding. Sometimes you might have a seed running from a PowerShell window and then when you check the green progress bar is no longer visible as you might have had a refresh on domain controllers or you have a 3rd party app that […]

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If you manage quite a few Exchange 2010 CAS servers, logging into each one to test that OWA works can be quite cumbersome. I put together a script that can check all of them and email you a report. Here is an example: The URL for each CAS server will show, for example cas01.tlab.local and […]

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In Exchange 2016, there are a couple of cmdlets you can run to check that you servers are in a healthy state. In 1x example, you could run the following command to check the Outlook Web Services: Test-OutlookWebServices If you want to specify a specific server then you can run the command below: Test-OutlookWebServices -ClientAccessServer […]

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In one of my previous posts we installed PowerShell 7 on Windows 10. In my lab I installed PowerShell 7 on my Exchange 2016 Server. While there is no support for Exchange yet, Active Directory cmdlets work. To install the preview you can run the command below from an elevated PowerShell Window: iex “& { […]

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I was playing around with PowerShell 6 and 7 RC which a colleague showed me was available. Firstly to get the new version, you need to run the following command below: (Note it includes the -Preview switch) iex “& { $(irm https://aka.ms/install-powershell.ps1) } -UseMSI -Preview” It does take a few minutes to bring up the […]

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Recently we had a request to update a whole stack of servers registry keys. With PowerShell this is easy to do. In the first step you need to set the location of where you want to work. In this case it was HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Location – Location being where you want to update the key. The command […]

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In any operating system, you may want to uninstall or remove a device like a network card for example that may be causing issues. Launching Device Manager does not show the device and as an example you cannot rename you network card because it says the device already exists. You can run the command below […]

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With PowerShell you can pretty much do anything. In this article we disabled Netbios using a registry key, however you can do the same using WMI and PowerShell as well as removing the tick box for Lmhosts on a Network Card. To do this, you can run the following set of commands: $NICS = Get-WmiObject […]

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Here is a quick tip on firstly how to check which domain controller the FSMO roles are situated on and secondly, moving the FSMO roles with one command. To determine which server/s are holding the the FSMO roles, you can run the command below: netdom query fsmo This will output the following: Schema Master Domain […]

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Quick tip for the day. Ever wanted to remove an alias from a Distribution Group and wondered how to do this with the Exchange Management Shell (EMS). It is pretty simple, you run the following command below: Set-distributiongroup GroupEmailAddress –EmailAddresses @{remove=’AliasAddress’} Replace the “GroupEmailAddress” with the Primary SMTP address and then the AliasAddress is the […]

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